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chrise

22nd February 2013, 15:14
If Chambers is reflecting usage rather than setting it (which, I suppose it would argue, should be the case) entries are not necessarily "correct" - for example, that baffling use of CREEK that came up on the RT9 thread (you know what I am referring to, jazzy).
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chrise

22nd February 2013, 15:22
Your link didn't work, jazzy - is the suffix correct?
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aristophanes

22nd February 2013, 15:24
I use dependent as both adjective and noun. My old Webster's has an entry for dependant as both, but with "see dependent". I just checked my tax forms and see that dependent is used as a noun on them. Would one ever use "independant"?
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jazzgirl

22nd February 2013, 15:24
I'll copy and paste instread: (GK eat your heart out !)

A dependant is person who is dependent on someone else. (For example, a child is dependent on its parents. Therefore, a child is a dependant of its parents.)

Example:
All embassy staff and their dependants must be at the airport by 6 o'clock.
(In this example, the word 'dependants' means spouses and children.)

Dependent

The word "dependent" is an adjective meaning 'contingent on', 'relying on', 'supported by' or 'addicted to'. The word 'dependant' refers to a person and is a noun.

Example:

I am dependent on the weather for a safe crossing.
(reliant on the weather)

Phew. lol
"
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chrise

22nd February 2013, 15:24
Found it - A is a noun, E is an adjective then, and Chambers is wrong to give them as interchangeable.

Thanks to all.
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chrise

22nd February 2013, 15:25
Especially jazzgirl!
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greedy kite

22nd February 2013, 17:58
chris, i still think it's the transatlantic element that was decisive here, as Aristo's contribution would seem to support partly at least. and the "NS", according to Google, was partly U.S. & definitely international from the beginning. I remember even as a non-scientist having that impression when I occasionally read s'thing in it in the Sixties.
To conclude (& this may shock Aristo): a UK form would ALWAYS spell the noun with -ant (in the economic sense of course): I am sure I've never ever seen it otherwise in Europe (foreign forms generally have the main headings in English,too). And as an adjective just as certainly -ent. OK?!
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chrise

22nd February 2013, 18:00
Thanks GK - sorry I missed yours, aristo. I would NEVER write INDEPENDANT!
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aristophanes

22nd February 2013, 18:32
Neither would I, but why is there the -ant variant for dependent then?
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