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greedy kite

4th February 2013, 07:45
@ chrisg: just curious to know how you found "hote" meaning "call" in Chaucer (connected with German "heisst") -- are you a Chaucer specialist or do you have access to Chaucer's vocabulary somewhere? Unfortunately didn't belong to my field of studies, but interests me!
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chrisg

4th February 2013, 08:04
12 Looks like GIPR (great indian peninsula railway)
Take ETH (a swiss band) from Perth and you are left with PR. All american private = GI + PR
I could be hopelessly wrong !
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chrisg

4th February 2013, 08:07
@GK - I know very little about Chaucer - I thought that Pension was key to the answer so I looked up Hote and found the reference
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mah

4th February 2013, 09:49
Thanks chrisg
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greedy kite

4th February 2013, 10:58
Thank you, chrisg: I see it is possible to find such words either on the "free dictionary" or "babylon
9". I only read "The Clerk's Tale" for A-Levels & sometimes wish I'd gone on to study (old) English!
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ramekin

7th February 2013, 14:32
Hi, I've just registered.
12ac I have the answer as GIRR.
GI being the American private + RR abb of railroad
GIRR being a Scottish word for a hoop
I thought 6d was a bit obtuse, but I agree the answer is HOTE. I didn't make the connection between Chaucer and the "former laureate" because I hadn't realised Chaucer was a laureate!
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chrisg

7th February 2013, 14:50
Yes GIRR makes more sense than my original suggestion of GIPR
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trish

26th February 2013, 01:18
6dn Hote is an alternative, Spenserian spelling (hence the reference to former laureate, presumably) of 'hight', meaning named or called - and of course as has already been said, it's a shortened from of 'hotel' = pension.
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jerryw

28th February 2013, 20:39
To correct a small point, the Laureate referred to is (Edmund) Spenser, to whom use of the word is attributed in Chambers, not Chaucer who predates the post.
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