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aristophanes

10th January 2013, 16:57
We have the rock polypody, which occasionally grows on tree roots, but I never see ferns up in trees. Surely they can be found elsewhere in North America, perhaps even in New England, just not in the oak-beech-hickory ecosystem of my circumscribed world. We do have the most astoundingly beautiful woodland flowers here...
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chrise

10th January 2013, 17:00
Trilliums?
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aristophanes

10th January 2013, 17:08
On my property we have only Trillium erectum, which is often called wake-robin. The flowers are deep maroon- so beautiful. There's a sea of bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) next to my dooryard, and a smattering of the exquisite trout lily too (Erythronium americanum).
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chrise

10th January 2013, 17:20
We have a number of different Erythroniums in the garden - mainly revolutum and dens-canis. We also have S. canadensis, but unfortunatley have lost a beautiful double form.
We have tried Trilliums, but with no success - and they are expensive to get hold of over here. Never seen as much money thrown at a garden as at the Queen's "Savill Garden" - amongst other spectacular things it had a double-sided Trillium border, about 50 yards long and 12 feet deep!
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aristophanes

10th January 2013, 17:32
I no longer buy plants; I just use the ones that grow here naturally. I think my favorite is the most common, the false spikenard (Smilacina racemosa), which perhaps grows over there too- such a graceful habit. Snakeroot is another stunner (Cimicifuga racemosa).
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chrise

10th January 2013, 17:39
How I envy you, aristo - if we tried the same strategy, we would be growing buttercups, celandines, stinging nettles (which I think Americans are unfamiliar with), sycamores and ash - oh, and those pernicious American weeds, rose-bay willow herb and its relatives.
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aristophanes

10th January 2013, 17:45
I don't even know what rose-bay willow herb is, but you more than got back at us with plantain, which the Indians called something like Englishman's footprint. Aaaaargh! I'm forever pulling it up.
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aristophanes

10th January 2013, 17:49
Ah yes, fireweed. We don't have it around here.
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rosalind

10th January 2013, 19:32
I think rose-bay willow herb is a beautiful plant.....
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chrise

10th January 2013, 19:34
Indeed, rosalind - it was introduced as a border plant. It just has a distressing tendency to put itself everywhere!
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